Why Flexibility Matters as You Grow Older

Though it often takes a back seat to strength and cardiovascular fitness, flexibility plays a critical role in ensuring one’s able to maintain a high level of independence and mobility during their Golden Years.

While we tend to lose flexibility as we age, that doesn’t put seniors at the mercy of such changes. According to Peoria Physical Therapist Cindy Rankin, muscle elasticity can be maintained at any age.

“Staying flexible certainly takes effort, but the payoff is you’ll be able to stay more active and independent while you grow older, which should be all our goals,” said Rankin, Regional Director of Professional Therapy Services, with 12 locations in Southern and Central Illinois.

Flexibility is defined as one’s ability to move muscles and joints through their full ranges of motion. It’s a critical component of mobility, which also involves strength, balance and coordination.

Poor flexibility, says Rankin, impacts balance, posture, and overall feeling of tension in the body. It also affects daily living and the ability to avoid common ailments and injuries often related to aging.

As staying limber is an essential part of maintaining health and happiness while one ages, Rankin offers the following advice for maintaining flexibility:

Stay Active

The best and easiest first step in staying flexible is to simply stay active every day. Going for walks, playing with the grandkids, dancing, working in the garden, taking yoga or Pilates classes … they all help keep the body warm, loose and strong. Focus on daily activities you enjoy!

Warm Up Dynamically

Even when you aren’t necessarily exercising, it’s important to keep your muscles and joints loose by doing dynamic movements throughout the day. Movements like neck rolls, arm windmills, walking lunges, etc., take your muscles and joints through their full ranges of motion, keeping them loose and limber.

Stretch & Hold

Called static stretching, these bend-and-hold-type stretches (think touching your toes) help increase flexibility by putting light tension on your muscles and joints for 30 to 60 seconds at a time. These stretches work best after a brief warmup or following a workout or activity, though it can also be beneficial (and relaxing) to do them early in the morning or just before going to bed.

Use a Foam Roller

These affordable tools for self-massage will, when used properly, help release tension that develops over time in the muscles and connective tissues. This, according to the Mayo Clinic, helps increase flexibility and improve mobility.

Visit a Physical Therapist

Not sure where to start? Whether you’re already active and limber or wish to start down a path toward increased flexibility, visit your local physical therapist. After reviewing your medical history and assessing your current flexibility levels, a physical therapist will establish a personalized strategy for helping you reach your mobility and lifestyle goals.